60+ Articles Every Librarian Should Read- New and Improved

During my time in graduate school, I curated a list of articles to help both newly initiated and seasoned librarians. The list was generated from discussions with classmates, colleagues, professors, and my own interests at the time. I recently went back and read some of the articles on the original list and, while still relevant, a lot of the information contained in the articles needed a refresh.

This list was developed using similar techniques (talking with colleagues, friends, and even individuals outside of the library profession) and I also drew on current events for inspiration.

I am no longer “in the profession” but I still consider myself a librarian-at-large who is passionate about making the profession more than just story-time’s and read-a-likes. The library profession is definitely in need of an update, at least in terms of marketing, and librarians are now more important than ever. In an age of “fake news,” decreased privacy, and increased screen-time, a librarians job has shifted to that of information navigator and curator.

As always, I welcome additions to this list and love collaborating with those both in and out of the library!

Bibliometrics

Digital Literacy

Diversity and Cultural Competence

Fake News and Digital Navigation

Healthcare and Medical Education

  • Clifton, S., Jo, P., Longo, J. M., & Malone, T. (2017). Cultivating a community of practice: the evolution of a health information specialists program for public librarians. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 105(3), 254–261. https://doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2017.83
  • Epstein, B. A. (2017). Health sciences libraries in the United States: new directions. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 34(4), 307–311. https://doi.org/10.1111/hir.12199
  • Spencer, A. J., & Eldredge, J. D. (2018). Roles for librarians in systematic reviews: a scoping review. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 106(1), 46–56. https://doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2018.82
  • Townsend, W. A., Anderson, P. F., Ginier, E. C., MacEachern, M. P., Saylor, K. M., Shipman, B. L., & Smith, J. E. (2017). A competency framework for librarians involved in systematic reviews. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 105(3), 268–275. https://doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2017.189

Information Literacy/Instruction

Leadership

MLIS/MLS Education

  • Conklin, J. L. (2017). Developing librarian competencies for the digital age, edited by Jeffrey G. Coghill and Roger G. Russell. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 36(3), 307–308. https://doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2017.1332278
  • Kovar-Gough, I. (2017). Taking chances: a new librarian and curriculum redesign. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 36(2), 129–137. https://doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2017.1293973
  • Shahbazi, R., & Hedayati, A. (2016). Identifying digital librarian competencies according to the analysis of newly emerging IT-based LIS jobs in 2013. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 42(5), 542–550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2016.06.014
  • Worthington, B. (2017). Towards a better understanding of opportunities for performance training within the MLS curriculum: issues for enhancing education of children’s librarians. Journal of Education for Library & Information Science, 58(4), 202–218. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1159391

Political Landscape

Public Libraries

  • Giesler, M. A. (2017). A place to call home?: A qualitative exploration of public librarians’ response to homelessness. Journal of Access Services, 14(4), 188–214. https://doi.org/10.1080/15367967.2017.1395704
  • Ireland, S. (2017). Information literacy and instruction: for your information: using information literacy in public libraries. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 57(1), 12–16. https://doi.org/10.5860/rusq.57.1.6436

School Libraries

Staff and Personal Development

Technical

TEDx Talks

The Future of Libraries

Misc

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Medical Librarians and Coursera

Courses through the Medical Library Association are expensive. The American Library Association workshops are not only expensive, but are also rarely relevant to medical libraries. When it comes down to it, professional development courses for medical librarians can be difficult to come by (especially when you’re on a budget). While browsing Coursera the other day, I happened upon several courses that I thought might be useful to those of us in the academic health science and medical library field. I created a list of the courses “for future reference” and to have a curated list in one place. As more courses are added, I will try to update this list!

Coursera Courses:

Operation: Collection Development, Medical Library Edition

This semester I am taking LI855XS: Collection Development and Management. I love this course so far, and the teacher has been particularly amazing. For our second to last assignment, we were randomly assigned a library (law library, public library, academic library, etc…) and, as my luck would have it, I was assigned a medical library!

The point of the assignment was to create a poster that highlighted the “general activities that were in involved in collection development within this particular library.” My partner had never done any research on medical libraries, so of course I was ready to assist! We threw ourselves into the assignment and began to develop some ideas for the poster. I must have been feeling especially uninspired, since it took quite awhile for the idea to form.

After I had gone through multiple drafts, we finally came up with Operation Collection Development, Medical Library Edition. I must say, I could not be anymore more proud of the final poster if I tried! In order to give our fellow students a take-away from the presentation, I created “handouts” in the form of RX pill bottles. I modeled the labels off of the CVS pharmacy label.

Here are some pictures from the presentation:

Poster session display

Our setup for the presentation. My iPad displayed the page I created for the QR code.

Close up picture of the poster.

A photo showing some of the detail in the poster.

Close up of the pill bottles.

A photo showing off the RX handouts I created. We filled them with Skittles*.

We placed in the top three and were given a tassel, certificate, and some other fun prizes. It was a lot of fun to present our poster to a group of our peers! I wish I would have taken more pictures of the session as a whole, but I was glued to my poster for the majority of the walk-around!

The poster’s new home is in the Public Services area of the A. R. Dykes Health Sciences Library. I’ve had a few comments about it so far, so I think it is being put to good use.

Poster hanging in the medical library.

The poster is now on display at the Dykes Library at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

 

 

 

*Since when did they replace the green Skittles with green apple?! What happened to lime????