Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award

Sister Hood Award

Thanks http://conciergelibrarian14.com/ who nominated me for the Sisterhood of the World Blogger Award.  I have enjoyed her blog immensely and you should definitely check it out! In fact, you should follow, subscribe and regularly read her blog!

[Taken from http://conciergelibrarian14.com/ Nomination Post]

Here are the rules for this award:

  1. Say “Thank You” to the person who nominated you & link their blog to your post.
  2. Answer the 10 questions given to you.
  3. Pass the award on to 7 other bloggers (only nominating 2) and let them know they have been nominated.
  4. Include the Award Badge in your post.

10 Questions for my Nominees

1. If you could do it over again, would you select the same profession?

If I could do it all over again, I would probably finish out medical school. I would still work in the university library as a student worker, but I would pursue my MD.

2. What is your ideal vacation spot?

A big city, with lots to do! I love New York City, Chicago, Seattle etc…

3. What was your favourite subject in high school?

Science! In particular I liked the biological sciences and chemistry.

4. Mascara or eyebrow pencil?

Mascara. I don’t even own an eye brow pencil…

5. How long does it take for you to get ready for the day?

Depends on what I’m doing. If I’m getting ready for work, it normally takes me about 45 min- 1 hr. If I’m just running errands, I can be ready in about 20-30 min.

6. Where are you from?

The Midwest

7. Lipstick or lip gloss?

Lip gloss, preferably one that tastes good.

8. Who is your favourite singer?

Elliott Smith

9. Netflix or Hulu?

Normally I would say Netflix, but I have really been on a Hulu kick lately….

10. How many hours do you spend per week blogging?

Not as many as I should. I definitely have a lot of draft posts started though!

I am nominating:

https://dorkchopsworld.wordpress.com/

https://phantoness.wordpress.com/

Questions for my Nominees:

1. What is your favorite book? Have you read it more than once?

2. Do you have a favorite word? What is it?

3. Is there a place that you eat often? Do you always order the same thing?

4. What was your first thought when you woke up this morning?

5. If you could have personally witnessed anything, what would you want to have seen?

6. What/who can always cheer you up?

7. If you could create a job title for yourself, what would it be?

8. What website do you visit every day?

9. What is the most random thing you’ve ever watched all the way through on Netflix/Hulu?

10. What drives you to do what you do? What motivates you?

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But…why?

That is the response I get from many librarians when I tell them I’m interested in medical librarianship. Health sciences, medical and hospital libraries are the red-headed step children of the library world, apparently.

I began to notice a trend during the first semester of library school. When I would tell the other MLS students what I was interested in pursuing, they all seemed so surprised. It made me wonder what it was about medical librarianship that caused such a strong reaction. Maybe it’s the science and technology that is off-putting. I know that it’s hard to get a lot of English majors excited about data analysis, informatics, and databases.

While working in the public library, my basic work week included: cutting out a million + 1 construction paper stars for a preschool story time craft, perusing Pinterest for teen program ideas, creating interactive displays for my public patrons and general collection management/public services duties. I excelled in whatever I worked on, but it wasn’t necessarily challenging. Even if I had planned for 25 kids and 75 showed up, or someone challenged a YA book because of content, I never felt particularly overwhelmed. Even though by all standards, I was swamped with work, it was “fun” work.

The work that I do now is immensely more challenging and I actually go home at the end of the day with questions to be answered by Google (or more specialized databases). I no longer make crafts, rarely do I get to make a display, and the “advisory” lists I create are now literature reviews for clinicians.  Instead of reading books entitled ttyl, I’m picking up Health Informatics for Medical Librarians.

While a good majority of my classmates are taking “Designing and Implementing Programs for Children and Young Adults,” or “Resources and Services for Early Learners,” I decided to delve into the more technical world of library science. There are a few brave people who are following the same path, but when I talk to the vast majority of my classmates they appear to be interested in public libraries or just general “academic libraries.” Few are interested in health science libraries, and even fewer want to work in a medical/clinical environment.

So, to get to the point, why not medical librarianship? Because for most, it’s not seen as “fun.” Unless you already have an interest in the health sciences, it’s not an easy transition from children’s programming to literature searches.

I should know, I did it.

Thankfully, my background in the health sciences and my passion for medicine gave me a leg-up. However, for many would-be-librarians, the prospect of searching for the effects of ivermectin on geohelminth frequency, or using PubChem to resource bioactivity data for 2-tert0butylhydroquinone is not only daunting, but down right uninteresting.

What can we do to change the way future librarians look at medical librarianship? Marketing! Many of the library students I talked to didn’t actually know what my job entailed. When I started to explain to them that I was able to utilize emerging technologies in instructional sessions, interface with clinicians through electronic media, research elusive zebra diseases, and even create some dynamic displays that promote subsets of medical literature they became increasingly interested in medical librarianship as a potential field.

“But Aroundthestacks, why do you want more competition for those already coveted positions?!”, you may ask.

Because I want to see information professionals working with health professionals to provide the best possible care! I don’t want medical librarianship to be a last resort for unemployed MLS grads. Instead I want courses taught within MLS/MLIS programs that prepare students for work in healthcare. Without the proper preparation, new grads will be faced with unfamiliar medical terminology, over complicated scientific databases, and a dim view of the role librarians have in healthcare as a whole.

I want LIS students to be excited about medical librarianship! I want them to see how valuable they can be to medical professionals, researchers, and medical students. I want a new generation of physicians who are comfortable searching the literature and utilizing evidence-based medicine in their practices. Librarians can complement physicians, especially when helping them to navigate the murky waters of medical literature and they have to be able to see that this partnership can work, but that has to start in graduate school…

 

Lets Play a Game!

Can you guess which category the following titles belong in?

Your choices:

  • Library School Case Study
  • Adult Film Title
  • Romance Novel

The titles:

  1. Compromising Positions
  2. The Flasher
  3. The Arrangement
  4. Yellow Fever
  5. Family Connections
  6. Dhana’s Dilemma
  7. Crisis at the WPL: Dan Has AIDS
  8. The Trustee’s Wife
  9. Log Jam
  10. Polly wants a doctor
  11. Single white male
  12. The Librarian and the Centerfold
  13. Wild in the Stacks

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